Captivated by Lake Louise, Canada

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It was, in the truest sense of the word, awesome. A mottled, deep brown mass of instinctive apex predator. It wasn’t the sight I had expected in the lead up to the reputedly pristine beauty of Lake Louise but here, within 10 metres of us, stalked a grizzly bear. His shaggy fur and familiar face, combined with his slow lumber and apparent disregard for the world around him almost lulled me in to a false sense of security – despite its massive size and incredible power, the grizzly somehow was more inspirational than fearful. Or perhaps that was just the effect that hiking and camping across the Canadian rockies has on a traveller – an inspiring sense of awe in everything.

His massive, clawed paws padded laboriously along the roadside, lazily stopping every now and again to pick at a bunch of wildflowers, his food of choice it would appear. And then he was gone, trudging into the thicket, his dark brown body soon disappearing into the deep, leafy shade. The few 4x4s that were passing just at the right two minutes began to dissipate, and we ourselves pressed on towards the lake, and climb, ahead.

It is truly, truly impossible to describe the sheer beauty of lake Louise. It sits, sapphire blue, in the midst of a perfect valley. It’s backdrop is a range of snow-covered mountains rising out of lush, green forests. Flawlessly mountains towering overhead are mirrored perfectly in the glassy surface of the water, the odd canoe bobs restfully on its banks, content to sit unused amidst such wonders. The water, whilst inviting, is ice cold, a reflection of the frozen peaks standing along the banks. An eagle calls it’s appreciation as it takes flight nearby, as though it appreciates the privilege. Following its flight with my wide eyes, it soars past a peak which juts out before the rest, a ledge which would, if climbed, offer a perfect vista. Our guide informs us we can reach it.

The entire route was little more than seven kilometres, rising to about 2,300 metres above sea level. It led past “Mirror Lake”, and the equally beautiful Lake Agnes, before the steepest climb began to reach the viewpoint, known as the ‘Big Beehive’. The route to mirror lake was easily managed, the reward being far too generous for the effort required to get there, with the now much nearer mountains mirrored exactly in the small, pristine lake. Lake Agnes held it’s own charms, sitting in a natural ‘bowl’ in the curvature of the mountains, with a river cascading away down a drop off and flowing freely into the forests below. Half melted ice dotted the surface, giving the lake the appearance of frosted glass, an effect that was accentuated as we began the now punishingly steep climb up along the side of the mountain face lining Lake Agnes. Soon all we could see was rock, and ice.

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Then, spectacularly revealed to us as we rounded the final bend, the entire world opened up in before us. The horizon curved, the clouds within reach. Below, the vast oblong of Lake Louise stood in all her azure beauty, all the detail visible closer up replaced by one strikingly bold, utterly natural blue. Endless forest tore away from her into the distance, only stopping at the Rockies many miles away. Nature was putting on a spectacular display, unlike any image any artist or photographer could caputure. The purity of the air, the vastness of the landscape and the sheerness of the drop below was invigorating. We sat, marvelling, hanging our legs over the edge of the cliff, in silence. There was nothing to say. Lake Louise had cast her spell over more hapless visitors, and had nestled her way into their hearts forever. Words cannot describe her. Beautiful.

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